Health Services

COVID-19 Vaccination

Here is the latest information about COVID-19 vaccine and HealthPoint. Updated 1/19/21

Currently, we are not scheduling vaccines for patients or the public. 

HealthPoint hopes to receive vaccine for eligible patients from the state in the coming weeks.

 

What’s happening in Washington? 

The first COVID-19 vaccines have received approval for use in Washington. These vaccines are safe and effective. COVID-19 vaccine distribution in Washington happens in phases. Not everyone will be vaccinated right away. 

Currently, people eligible to receive the vaccine include:

  • Health care workers and residents of long-term care facilities
  • People aged 65 years and older 
  • People 50 years and older in multigenerational homes (for example, a person aged 50+ living with a grandchild.) 

FindYourPhaseWA.org  Use this link to learn when you are eligible for the vaccine. You can also find a list of locations where you can receive the vaccine. 

Right now, there is more demand for vaccine than available doses and appointments. Scheduling an appointment may take time. You may need to call several hospitals or clinics to find an appointment. Please be patient and check frequently.

When can I get the vaccine at HealthPoint? 
 

Currently, we are not scheduling vaccines for patients or the public. 

HealthPoint will notify patients eligible to receive the vaccine when we are able to schedule appoinments by phone, mail, and MyHealthPoint Patient Portal. 

What is HealthPoint doing now? 

HealthPoint is vaccinating our staff from HealthPoint and partner community health centers. We are following the State’s guidance to first vaccinate our health care workers so they can safely care for patients.  

We are preparing for patient vaccination in the coming weeks. This includes: 

  • Training our staff to give the vaccine 
  • Making plans to contact patients and make appointments 
  • Working with community partners to help people access and understand the vaccine 
  • Listening to and answering our patients’ and communities’ questions.

Please avoid calling HealthPoint about the vaccine.

View the FAQ below for more answers to questions. Check this webpage weekly for updates about vaccine availability.
 

Information about how the vaccine works, availability, and safety:  

Email communications@healthpointchc.org if you still have questions or to share feedback with us.  

When can I get the COVID-19 vaccine?

Updated 1/19/21

Currently, HealthPoint is not scheduling vaccines for patients or the public.  

HealthPoint will notify patients eligible to receive the vaccine when we are able to schedule appoinments by phone, mail, and MyHealthPoint Patient Portal. 

In Washington, the first doses of COVID-19 vaccine are being given to:

- Health care workers and residents of long-term care facilities

- People aged 65 years and older 

- People 50 years and older in multigenerational homes (for example, a person aged 50+ living with a grandchild.) 

Eventually, everyone who wants to be vaccinated will have access to it. 

Visit findyourphase.org to learn when you may be eligible for the vaccine in Washington. You can also find a list of locations where you can receive the vaccine. 

Right now, there is more demand for vaccine than available doses and appointments. Scheduling an appointment may take time. You may need to call several hospitals or clinics to find an appointment. Please be patient and check frequently.

How much does it cost?

The vaccine will be covered by Medicaid, Medicare, and most private insurance. It will be free if you are uninsured. There may be a copay depending on your plan. 

How is the vaccine given?

The COVID-19 vaccines currently available require two doses. The first shot starts building protection and the second shot increases and completes the protection.

Your second shot should be given 21 or 28 days after the first one, depending on the type of vaccine. You will need to get the same type of vaccine for both shots. When you get your first shot, your vaccination provider will give you information about when to get the second dose.

Are there side effects?

Some people might have symptoms like headache, a sore arm, fatigue, or fever after getting the shot. This is normal and a good sign that the body's immune system is building up protection. Contact your health care provider if: 

- Side effects feel severe or last more than a few days 

- Redness or tenderness where you got the shot increases after 24 hours (it is normal for the area to be a little sore for a few days) 

When you receive your vaccination, you will get information about how to use your smartphone to sign up for V-Safe. V-Safe is the CDC’s mobile app that helps you track health effects after you receive the vaccine. 

What about the unknown or long-term effects?

Vaccines are tested for safety and effectiveness before they are approved for use. Tens of thousands of people received COVID-19 vaccines without serious side effects. 

It is possible that rare side effects may happen when millions of people are vaccinated. For this reason, the safety of COVID-19 vaccines will continue to be monitored after they are given. 

Are COVID-19 vaccines safe?

The U.S. vaccine safety system ensures that all vaccines are as safe as possible. COVID-19 vaccines are tested for safety and effectiveness in clinical trials before they are approved for use. Vaccines are not approved if the U.S. vaccine safety system finds they may not be safe.  

In December, the Food and Drug Administration approved the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine. This means the Pfizer vaccine was found to be safe to use in the U.S. It is expected that more COVID-19 vaccines will be approved soon. 

For more information about vaccine safety, read 8 Things to Know about the Coronavirus Vaccine from CDC. 

Why should I get the COVID-19 vaccine?

Vaccines are important to keep you healthy, and to protect the people you care about. The more people who are vaccinated for COVID-19, the sooner we can be together again.  

HealthPoint encourages everyone who is able to receive the vaccine to do so, to protect yourself and your loved ones.  

We understand this is an important decision. It is your right to decide if you want to receive a vaccine. You should use the most accurate information to make a decision. If you have any concerns about the vaccine, talk to your provider. It is their job to help you make the best choices about your health, like receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. 

How does the vaccine work?

The COVID-19 vaccine teaches your immune system to recognize the coronavirus. When you get the vaccine, your immune system makes antibodies (“fighter cells”). These fighter cells stay in your blood and protect you in case you are infected with the virus. You get protection against the disease without having to get sick. 

COVID-19 vaccines do not cause COVID-19 illness. The vaccines don’t include live or weakened virus. 

If I receive the COVID-19 vaccine, do I still need to take precautions like wearing a mask?

Yes. COVID-19 vaccines are just one tool to help us end the pandemic. Continue to cover your mouth and nose with a mask around others. Wash your hands frequently. Stay at least 6 feet away from others. Avoid crowds and gatherings inside your home with people who don’t live with you. 

Should children receive the COVID-19 vaccine?

The Pfizer vaccine has been approved only for people who are 16 years of age or older.  

The Moderna vaccine has been approved only for people who are 18 years of age or older.  

More studies are needed before the vaccines can be approved for younger children.

Should pregnant or breastfeeding people receive the vaccine?

Yes, pregnant and breast-feeding people can get the vaccine. Your health care provider will discuss with you the benefits and potential risks. 

- None of the clinical trials for the COVID-19 vaccine included pregnant or breast-feeding people.

- The risk of the vaccine to pregnant people or the fetus is unknown, but believed to be low.

- It's important to remember that COVID-19 disease is a greater risk for pregnant people, especially those with other medical conditions.

I have allergies and/or have had an allergic reaction to vaccines.

You can still get the vaccine if you have a food or oral (taken by mouth) medication allergy. 

*Tell your doctor if you have ever had an immediate (within 4 hours) allergic reaction to any vaccine. Your doctor will help you decide if it is safe for you to get vaccinated for COVID-19.*

I've had COVID-19. Should I get the vaccine?

Yes. If you have tested positive for COVID-19 in the past 90 days, we recommend that you wait. This allows others who remain at higher risk for infection to be vaccinated first. Current evidence suggests reinfection is uncommon 90 days after the initial infection. 

I have more questions about COVID-19 vaccines.

Read this FAQ from Seattle & King County Public Health. Available in many languages at the bottom of the page.